Basic Electronics Damage Analysis
DAM13e

Course format: Online training with posttest
I-CAR Credit Hours: 2 hours
Estimated Duration: 2 hours
Pricing
Gold Class: $76.00
Platinum: $76.00
Standard: $92.00

This course helps satisfy ProLevel training requirements for the following roles:
Estimator
Auto Physical Damage Appraiser

This course meets New Technology training requirements for the following roles:
Auto Physical Damage Appraiser

This course is an Annual Training option for the following roles:
Estimator
Steel Structural Technician
Aluminum Structural Technician
Non-Structural Technician
Auto Physical Damage Appraiser

  • Identify the basic requirements for a circuit and understand how circuit values are measured
  • Understand other parts of a circuit and what they are designed to do
  • Recognize collision damage to wiring and the possibilities for repair
  • Identify the tools and steps required when troubleshooting an electrical circuit problem


The course begins with information on how to begin analysis on a vehicle with electrical damage. The student will receive an overview of what makes up a circuit, and gain an understanding of how circuits are tested and some of the different testing equipment that is available. As the student moves through the course, he or she will gain an understanding of how properly communicating damage to basic electronics is highly important during the collision repair process. He or she will be introduced to the three most common problems with electrical circuits and gain an understanding of the problems that can occur with electrical systems during a collision, as well as what it takes to diagnose the problems and how they should be repaired. The student will be introduced to the I CAR Troubleshooting Flowchart, which lists five steps to finding the source of an electrical problem and defining the path. Next, he or she will gain insight into the different parts of a circuit, their locations, and common problems. The student will learn why resistance has an important role in a circuit, the relationship between voltage, current, and resistance, and information on digital volt-ohm meters (DVOM). He or she will examine considerations around inspecting damage to switches and wiring issues, and conclude with information on electricity and magnetism.